Friday, October 30, 2015

Hiding Places - Erin Healy

Title: Hiding Places
Author: Erin Healy
Paperback: 351 pages
Published date: September 2015
Publisher: Thomas Nelson
FTC: Received from publisher

I love when I receive review books that I wouldn't normally have picked up and I end up really enjoying them. I tend to gravitate towards historical fiction, even in my suspense or mystery category. But Erin Healy's Hiding Places reminded me to branch out more often. I was also excited that Erin Healy lives in Colorado, which is where I am from, and the story takes place there. Yay!

Back of the book:

Eleven-year old Kate keeps her knowledge to herself - one sister's stash of marijuana, the other's petty cash pilfering, her grandfather's contraband candy bars. She protects her mother and Gran, too, screening out critical comments from the hotel suggestions box. But suddenly the stakes are raised; her grandfather's best friend is murdered the day after Kate heard the two men arguing.

At the same time, far from the quiet mountain resort, a homeless man flees a robbery gone wrong...a gang member seeks revenge for the death of his son...and a boy chooses the worst time to wield spray paint on a store window. In a strange and spiraling sequence of events, their disparate worlds collide at Harrison Lodge.

Kate offers shelter to one of them, unaware of the terrible consequences to the family she loves. But people can hide in all kinds of ways, sometimes even in plain sight...and some secrets are just waiting to be exposed.

My thoughts:

I've probably mentioned this before, but I love when an author shows events unfold through a child's point of view and it actually works and sounds authentic.  I loved the character of Kate. You can tell that she's very smart, self-aware, and able to take care of herself. She's trying to make sense of it all without seeing things through adult eyes but also not completely naive.

Erin Healy also shows the points of view of a couple other characters, including Charlie a young adult who left an abusive home situation and has been homeless for a few years. And then there's the Fox, a man who's torn between life as a gang member and his role as a caring father who is trying to keep his son from following the same path. He was such an interesting character because while he made a lot of bad decisions, he was such a sympathetic character. Well done! Then there's Pearl who is Kate's great-grandmother and who is kind of used to pretending to be crazy and staying out of the way. I liked that she has this awakening of realization that she needs to be more involved in her life and her family.

Hiding Places is technically a Christian fiction book but there really isn't a big Christian theme that I could notice.  I do like that it shows real world people who aren't "bad" or "good" but just living life as it is dealt...making good decisions and bad but once you get into their heads and stories, while you might not agree, there is an understanding. People don't often get up one day and think to themselves, this is the day I'm going to mess up my life.  Often, events and things just spiral out of control.  But then you see people who could make the easy decision and way out but decide to do the right thing and it's amazing.

Again, I liked that the whole story took place in Colorado - Denver and a fictional mountain lodge. I mean we all know that the underbelly of the world exists but to read about it in a familiar setting just makes it hit home a little bit more.

I haven't read anything else by Erin Healy but I will be checking her books out in the future.

Check out Erin Healy's website and Facebook page

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Once Upon a Crime - P.J. Brackston

Title: Once Upon a Crime (A Brothers Grimm Mystery #2)
Author: P.J. Brackston
Paperback: 245 pages (ARC version)
Publisher: Pegasus Crime
Published date: July 2015
FTC: Received from publisher for review

Earlier this year I reviewed P.J. Brackston's first Grimm Mystery Gretel and the Case of the Missing Frog Prints and I thoroughly enjoyed it. So when the publishing company asked if I wanted to read and review mystery #2 I said yes! I am so glad I did. This series is going to be one of my go-to vacation mystery books. You know, the books you read on vacation knowing that you will enjoy it.

While Once Upon a Crime is #2 in the series, it actually goes back in time a tad and clears up some of the interesting story lines that were introduced in book #1.  For instance, what is Gretel's connection with the royal family and how did she meet the dashing General Ferdinand? I am pretty sure that if you read this book first it wouldn't be confusing at all for you.

There are a few things about this series that makes me want to recommend it. First, I absolutely love the enigma that is Gretel of Gesternstadt (yes, that Gretel) from Hansel and Gretel fame and private detective for hire.  She's overweight, complains quite a bit, and is a little obsessed with food, hair, and clothing. On paper, she should be irritating and unlikeable but I do...I really like her. The humor that runs throughout the book has you chuckling amidst all the mystery, murder, and mayhem. I also love the historical setting of the story. It takes place not in some mythical fairy tale realm but in a real German local and she makes the cobblestone setting all too believable.

I'm definitely looking forward to further adventures of Gretel of Gesternstadt.

Back of the book:

From New York Times bestselling author P. J. Brackston comes the prequel to Gretel and the Case of the Missing Frog Prints, the new novel in the rollicking series featuring Gretel, all grown up and working as a private investigator in 18th century Bavaria.

Gretel (yes, that Gretel) is now 35, very large, still living with her brother Hans, and working as a private investigator. The small, sleepy town of Gesternstadt is shaken to its pretty foundations when the workshop of the local cart maker is burnt to the ground, and a body is discovered in the ashes. It is Gretel who notices that the cadaver is missing a finger. 

At first, she does not see this as significant, as her mind is fully focused on a new case. Not that she wouldn’t far rather be investigating an intriguing murder, but her client is willing to pay over the odds, so she must content herself with trying to trace three missing cats. It is not until she is further into her investigations that she realizes the two events are inextricably and dangerously connected, and that the mystery of the missing cats will lead her into perilous situations and frightening company. 

Very soon Gretel finds herself accused of kidnapping Princess Charlotte, twice locked up in the cells at the Summer Schloss, repelling the advances of an amorous troll, strapped to a rack in Herr Schmerz’s torture chamber, and fleeing a murder charge. With dubious help from her brother (whose scant wits are habitually addled by drink), she must prove her innocence, solve the puzzle of the unidentified corpse, and find the stolen cats before they meet a grisly end.

Sunday, September 6, 2015

R.I.P. X

I have been horrible at blogging lately but how could I not join this year's TENTH R.I.P.!! I love the celebration that Carl over at Stainless Steel Droppings started and have been participating for a few years. This year The Estella Society is hosting the event. In case you haven't seen this before:

R.I.P. X officially runs from September 1st through October 31st

Dark Fantasy.
Or anything sufficiently moody that shares a kinship with the above.
That is what embodies the stories, written and visual, that we celebrate with the R.eaders I.mbibing P.eril event.
I think I am going to live dangerously this time and join in on this one:
Peril the First: Read four books, any length, that you feel fit (the very broad definitions) ofR.I.P. literature. It could be King or Conan Doyle, Penny or Poe, Chandler or Collins, Lovecraft or Leroux…or anyone in between.

I know I've already have one mystery under my belt, one of P.J. Brackston's fun A Brothers Grimm Crime Mystery.  I am in the middle of reading a Poisoned Pen Press classic British mystery written in 1932 and I'm also starting Alan Furst's first Night Soldiers novel.

Don't you just love this season? I love that Carl's event just perfectly sums up how I feel about the changing weather and my favorite season. 

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Crow Hollow - Michael Wallace

Title: Crow Hollow
Author: Michael Wallace
Paperback: 335 pages
Publisher: Lake Union Publishing
Published date: June 2015
FTC: Received from publisher to review

When I received an email asking if I wanted to review Michael Wallace's novel Crow Hollow, I was intrigued. I normally don't jump onto tours or review unknown authors anymore since with two little ones I just get swamped but I love this time period. One of my favorite movies is The Last of the Mohicans and I love learning about early United States history. Crow Hollow takes place almost a century before The French and Indian War, just after a period in history I wasn't too familiar with - King Philip's War. I love learning new things. Anyway, mix the time period in with an English spy (you got me there) and a young widow trying to find her daughter held captive by native's a great read.

Back of the book:

In 1676, an unlikely pair—a young Puritan widow and an English spy—journeys across a land where greed and treachery abound.
Prudence Cotton has recently lost her husband and is desperate to find her daughter, captured by the Nipmuk tribe during King Philip’s war. She’s convinced her daughter is alive but cannot track her into the wilderness alone. Help arrives in the form of James Bailey, an agent of the crown sent to Boston to investigate the murder of Prudence’s husband and to covertly cause a disturbance that would give the king just cause to install royal governors. After his partner is murdered, James needs help too. He strikes a deal with Prudence, and together they traverse the forbidding New England landscape looking for clues. What they confront in the wilderness—and what they discover about each other—could forever change their allegiances and alter their destinies.
My thoughts:

I am so glad I decided to review Crow Hollow because it was an excellent read. From the first chapter I was sucked into James Bailey and Prudence Cotton's story.  It alternates between their perspectives and I loved getting into both of their heads. Michael Wallace did a great job of setting the stage and story without overly going into the history or bogging it down with details. That said, the details he did include filled out this past world perfectly. I could completely visualize this time period.

Getting into James and Prudence's story, it was fascinating to see all the politics that went on during this time period. I realized that I didn't know much about the autonomy some of these early colonies had. There was also fairly good friction between countries too, the Dutch in New York and the French not to mention the various Native tribes who's alliance were as individual as tribes. Crow Hollow is really almost a murder mystery with political intrigue and conspiracy thrown in and a touch of romance. It was all really well balanced and flowed incredibly well. I kept thinking this would make a fascinating movie or mini-series.

As for the characters themselves, I thought they were incredibly well written. James Bailey walks that fine line being a womanizing Crown's agent and cad and falls into the fortunately better role of being an honorable hero. Prudence Cotton's character also walks that fine line of being an irritating desperate widow and falls into the better role of being a self-reliant and independent woman. Prudence's back story of being held captive by a Native tribe after watching her town's massacre and then the retribution and massacre of many natives. On top of losing her husband and daughter, I just felt like Prudence's amazing resilience and compassion was awesome to read.

If you like historical fiction this is a great read but regardless of the time period, if you like mystery, intrigue, and conspiracy, Crow Hollow is a great pick.

Friday, May 15, 2015

The Precious One - Marisa de los Santos

Title: The Precious One
Author: Marisa de los Santos
Hardcover: 359 pages
Publisher: HarperCollins
Published date: March 2015
FTC: Requested from publisher

Marisa de los Santos is one of my comfort authors. You know what I mean. Those authors that when their book comes out, you'll want to read it, stay up too late at night reading it, and will enjoy it. It's your go-to when you want out of a reading slump which is what happened with The Precious One. It's going to have intelligent writing, sympathetic characters, and a good story, but not I'm not going to have to overly think. I never pick up her books thinking, eh, I don't feel like delving back into this story.

Back of the book:

In all her life, Eustacia “Taisy” Cleary has given her heart to only three men: her first love, Ben Ransom; her twin brother, Marcus; and Wilson Cleary — professor, inventor, philanderer, self-made millionaire, brilliant man, breathtaking jerk: her father.

Seventeen years ago, Wilson ditched his first family for Caroline, a beautiful young sculptor. In all that time, Taisy’s family has seen Wilson, Caroline, and their daughter Willow only once. 

Why then, is Wilson calling Taisy now, inviting her for an extended visit, encouraging her to meet her pretty sister — a teenager who views her with jealousy, mistrust, and grudging admiration? Why, now, does Wilson want Taisy to help him write his memoir?

Told in alternating voices — Taisy’s strong, unsparing observations and Willow’s naive, heartbreakingly earnest yearnings — The Precious One is an unforgettable novel of family secrets, lost love, and dangerous obsession, a captivating tale with the deep characterization, piercing emotional resonance, and heartfelt insight that are the hallmarks of Marisa de los Santos’s beloved works.

My thoughts:

I love books about family relationships. There are just so many facets to explore when it comes to families. When I picked up The Precious Ones, I thought it just be from Taisy's perspective. I was pleasantly surprised when I realized that the chapters alternate between Taisy and her half sister Willow. It's pretty rare when I don't have a preference - I thoroughly enjoyed both Taisy and Willow's story and their unique voice.

Taisy is in her early 30s and gets a phone call from her father that he wants her to come help him write his memoir. Taisy is a pretty successful ghostwriter but she hasn't had contact with her father since he left their family when she and her twin brother were 18. I love that while intellectually she knows her father isn't ever going to be the father she wants, she still craves his approval. He is her weakness. I love that while Taisy is an attractive, good character, she doesn't come across as annoying. Perhaps because we see her perfection often through the eyes of her half sister who is pretty critical of this interloper.

Which leads to Willow. I loved Willow's voice.  Sheltered, home-schooled, and very intelligent, Willow is a beautiful teenager but very naive in a lot of things. Her weakness is her complete adoration of her father. I loved her intelligence so it was fun reading her often pettiness and teenage selfishness come out in her seemingly wise beyond her age voice.

Both sisters go through their own trials and situations that make them realize that hurt people hurt. That family is important and often flawed. That putting people on pedestals is never a good idea. That everyone makes mistakes but forgiveness is key.

Other stuff:

Have you ever read any of Marisa de los Santos' books? Who is your comfort author(s)?

Here's two of my comforts - a good book and coffee.  It's hard to tell from the photos but I love the cover, it's got a really cool feel.

Check out my reviews of her other books:
Belong to Me
Falling Together

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Station Eleven - Emily St. John Mandel

Title: Station Eleven
Author: Emily St. John Mandel
Hardcover: 352 pages (my version eBook)
Publisher: Knopf
Published date: 2014
FTC: Library eBook

I had heard a lot of buzz about Emily St. John Mandel's apocalyptic novel Station Eleven and to be honest, I adore dsytopian or apocalyptic novels. I know I know. I just can't get enough. That and it won or was a finalist for a ton of awards and let's be honest...I love the cover. (Hands clapping for the designer.) Anyway, I am still pondering exactly what I think of it. It's definitely a story that will stick with you so not easily forgettable and the writing is definitely superb.  But the story. Hmm. Let's just say I find that it really doesn't matter what the story is, if you write it in a non-linear format you have a higher chance for getting accolades. Just saying.

Back of the book:

An audacious, darkly glittering novel set in the eerie days of civilization's collapse, Station Eleven tells the spellbinding story of a Hollywood star, his would-be savior, and a nomadic group of actors roaming the scattered outposts of the Great Lakes region, risking everything for art and humanity.

One snowy night Arthur Leander, a famous actor, has a heart attack onstage during a production of King Lear. Jeevan Chaudhary, a paparazzo-turned-EMT, is in the audience and leaps to his aid. A child actress named Kirsten Raymonde watches in horror as Jeevan performs CPR, pumping Arthur's chest as the curtain drops, but Arthur is dead. That same night, as Jeevan walks home from the theater, a terrible flu begins to spread. Hospitals are flooded and Jeevan and his brother barricade themselves inside an apartment, watching out the window as cars clog the highways, gunshots ring out, and life disintegrates around them.

Fifteen years later, Kirsten is an actress with the Traveling Symphony. Together, this small troupe moves between the settlements of an altered world, performing Shakespeare and music for scattered communities of survivors. Written on their caravan, and tattooed on Kirsten's arm is a line from Star Trek: "Because survival is insufficient." But when they arrive in St. Deborah by the Water, they encounter a violent prophet who digs graves for anyone who dares to leave.

Spanning decades, moving back and forth in time, and vividly depicting life before and after the pandemic, this suspenseful, elegiac novel is rife with beauty. As Arthur falls in and out of love, as Jeevan watches the newscasters say their final good-byes, and as Kirsten finds herself caught in the crosshairs of the prophet, we see the strange twists of fate that connect them all. A novel of art, memory, and ambition, Station Eleven tells a story about the relationships that sustain us, the ephemeral nature of fame, and the beauty of the world as we know it.

My Thoughts:

In the story the world as we know it ends through a very contagious, fast spreading virus with a high mortality rate. Most people in the world die. Without people running things, it all just winds down. For instance, people who are in an airport when the "world ends" are kind of just left living in the airport for the next 20 years. Crazy but the book makes insanely believable sense.

I love how the story follows the Traveling Symphony who are like old school troubadours, traveling and performing "Because survival is insufficient." I love that view of humanity. Kirsten, the main character in the book in the Traveling Symphony is a great character and I love how she has hung on to this comic book from her childhood, Station Eleven, and how the name of the novel gets its name from that comic book.

I think the only thing I wasn't too thrilled about was Arthur's whole story which is a flashback to before the "end of the world." I mean, I get that it was sort of necessary to understand how Kirsten got the comic book but really, it was kind of a cliched Hollywood story that I didn't really care too much about in the midst of this apocalyptic story that was pretty fascinating with it's whole, ok pretty cliched too, prophet who is wrecking havoc.

So I guess that's where I'm left. She is a great writer. The characters are well developed and I love the traveling symphony part of the story. I like the comic book as part of the story. And again, if you write a non-linear story it is pretty fun to read and I've noticed award winning books are often non-linear. But. The story had a lot of cliched aspects. And I really didn't care for the main Arthur story which is a lot of the book. So....

Have you read Station Eleven? Great? Meh? Thoughts?

Friday, April 24, 2015

The Winter Guest - Pam Jenoff

Title: The Winter Guest
Author: Pam Jenoff
Publisher: Harlequin Mira
Published date: 2014
Paperback: 341 pages (ARC version)
FTC: Received ARC from publisher to review

I'd heard of Pam Jenoff but I had never read any of her books before. I'd been wanting to read her WWII books The Kommandant's Girl and its follow up The Diplomat's Wife.  So when I received another WWII book The Winter Guest to review I delved in. I have to admit it took me longer to finish than normal. It was great writing, interesting area in Poland, it just seemed to drag a bit. BUT it did have a nice twisty turn at the end.  A good read but not my favorite WWII book.

Back of the book:

A stirring novel of first love in a time of war and the unbearable choices that could tear sisters apart, from the celebrated author of The Kommandant's Girl 

Life is a constant struggle for the eighteen-year-old Nowak twins as they raise their three younger siblings in rural Poland under the shadow of the Nazi occupation. The constant threat of arrest has made everyone in their village a spy, and turned neighbor against neighbor. Though rugged, independent Helena and pretty, gentle Ruth couldn't be more different, they are staunch allies in protecting their family from the threats the war brings closer to their doorstep with each passing day. 

Then Helena discovers an American paratrooper stranded outside their small mountain village, wounded, but alive. Risking the safety of herself and her family, she hides Sam—a Jew—but Helena's concern for the American grows into something much deeper. Defying the perils that render a future together all but impossible, Sam and Helena make plans for the family to flee. But Helena is forced to contend with the jealousy her choices have sparked in Ruth, culminating in a singular act of betrayal that endangers them all—and setting in motion a chain of events that will reverberate across continents and decades.

My thoughts:

I always enjoy books about sisters. I have a sister (and brother) and I always find reading about the different sibling dynamics so interesting. While I know all siblings have their unique odd idiosyncrasies, I just didn't quite buy the disconnect between Ruth and Helena.  The narration is told from both Ruth and Helena's perspectives and it was pretty obvious that the reader wasn't supposed to quite like Ruth and root for Helena. That said I did like getting into the heads of both sisters and how these twins had such different experiences and perspectives. I really felt for the sisters who were left taking care of their siblings, such an enormous responsibility in peace time and an almost impossible task during wartime.

It was interesting to read about Poland during this period as the Nazi's are moving in and no one can hide from their presence. If you are looking for a really good romance, this probably isn't the one to pick up. There is a romantic story between Helena and Sam, the downed American but for some reason I didn't really find it too stirring. Not bad, just ok. It all seemed a bit juvenile but then again, they were all young, just teenagers so there's that.

Like I said above, the story didn't really pick up until almost the end, around 250 pages in. Yeah. So while good writing, engaging characters and a good historical time period, it just kind of dragged a bit. I still want to check out her book The Kommandant's Girl. Pam Jenoff is a wonderful writer and I was fascinated by her as an author in her acknowledgments.  She worked at the Pentagon and was in Slovakia for the 50th Anniversary of WWII when she heard a true story that inspired this story. I think that's why I still am drawn to WWII stories because it was such a perilous and tumulus time that the true stories (and thus fictional ones) to come out of that period are so numerous and fascinating.